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Wholemeal, wholegrain and wholewheat....?



Wholemeal, wholegrain and wholewheat describes bread that are made using  unrefined “wholegrain” flour.

Whole wheat means that the bread is made from the entire wheat kernel

Wholegrain means the bread was made using the entire kernel, which offers the most nutritional value. 
Whole grain means that the bread can be made of any whole-grain kernel. That grain may be wheat or it could be another grain like spelt, oats, or barley.
Wholegrains are healthy because they are rich in antioxidants bound with B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and folate) and minerals (calcium, iron, phosphorus, magnesium and selenium, protein and fibre.

Recommendations? Get bread that uses a mix of wholegrains, such as  barley, rolled oats, millet or rye. Rye bread is excellent for digestion and helps prevent constipation. 

Note: What about Multigrain? 5-grain or 7-grain don’t always mean they use wholegrain in their formula. 
As for which is healthiest, just go for breads with the word “whole” in their descriptions. But note that just because a bread looks brown, it doesn’t mean it’s healthy – its colour could have been affected by processed sugar or colouring.
How do you know if your bread is healthy for you?
- NEVER go by colour of the bread. A brown bread doesnt mean it is healthy. The color might result from coloring or processed sugar. 

- you must CHECK the Ingredients
Is the first ingredient on the list wholegrain?
Check if it has more than 2g of fibre? 
Check for the words -  “inulin” or “polydextrose”
Inulin and polydextrose are two additives used to artificially boost fibre.

Benefits of wholegrains:
- good for weight management
- contains folate, great for healthy baby development during pregnancy
- reduces cholesterol
- withs its b vitamins - great for heart health and nerves conduction
These are various versions:



Dee Dee Mahmood, multi award winning Celebrity Exercise Physiologist and Nutritionist, is the Academic Adjunct Senior Lecturer at Edith Cowan University Australia. Her PhD research on obesity was chosen for its impact on obesity in Asia and was accepted and presented at the President's Cup Award, American College of Sports Medicine Northwest Annual Meeting in Tacoma, Washington. Ambassadors to brands like Reebok, Norwegian Seafood Council and Celebrity Beaute, this TEDX  Speaker has several signature community programs to her name, Fat2Fit Asia and Walking Football for Health Asia. She conducts  synergy on community and corporate health and research collaborations internationally. Dee Dee has just been appointed the International Scientific Committee and International Ambassador for the World Conference on Exercise Medicine, supported by World Health Organisation (WHO).

Read more:

http://iamdeedeemahmood.blogspot.sg/2017/10/i-am-dee-dee-mahmood.html




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