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Vitamins and minerals - from your plate - not from your medicine cabinet, FIRSTLY.

Important things we MUST have on our plate:
Fiber + Vitamins & Minerals + Phytochemicals

Fiber is the part of plant foods that we cannot digest. 
What does fibre-rich food do?
It helps 
- reduce total and LDL ("bad") cholesterol, 
- improve blood sugar control and 
- prevent constipation. 
High-fiber foods make you full faster and hungry slower. It is excellent for weight management. 

Good high-fiber foods:
  • brown rice
  • bulgur (cracked wheat)
  • barley
  • oats
  • nuts
  • beans and lentils
  • apples
  • blueberries
  • carrots
Vitamins and minerals. Vitamins are organic substances found in plants and animals and minerals are inorganic elements from the earth (soil and water). They are both are essential for normal growth and optimal health.
Vitamins and minerals that are crucial for good health, and the following are the best food sources of each:
  • vitamin A — carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, kale
  • vitamin B12 — meat, poultry, fish
  • vitamin E — nuts, seeds, vegetable oils
  • iron — meat, poultry, fish, and beans

Phytochemicals are made by plants. They are not essential to life, but they do have a positive effect on health. Phytochemicals-rich diets have been linked with a lower risk of chronic diseases, such as cancer and heart disease. They are found in fruits, vegetables, beans, and grains.

The following are the best food sources of key phytochemicals:
  • flavonoids — blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries
  • carotenoids — orange vegetables such as carrots, sweet potatoes
  • lycopene — tomatoes
  • isoflavones — soy foods, such as soybeans (or edamame)
  • resveratrol — red grapes
  • catechins — teas

Creativity pays in health! 
- Adding finely grated carrots to pasta sauce, meat loaf, chili, or a stew is one way to get an extra serving of vegetables. 
- Dip vegetables such as cucumber and celery into hummus or another bean spread, some spiced yogurt, or even a bit of ranch dressing.
- Slather peanut butter on a banana or slices of apple. 
- Mashed avocado as a dip with diced tomatoes and onions
- Mashed potato as a sandwich spread, topped with spinach leaves, tomatoes, and a slice of cheese.

Yours always in good health and happiness,

Dee Dee






Dee Dee Mahmood is an Academic Adjunct Senior Lecturer (International Collaborations) at Edith  Cowan University Australia as well as:

- Consultant, Exercise Physiologist &  Nutritionist
- Golden Key International Honor Society Scholar
- TEDX Speaker
- 2018 International Scientific Committee & International Ambassador of World Conference on Exercise Medicine-WHO

More about Dee Dee on:



Tel:
Singapore : (65) 9180 7372
Malaysia:    (60) 1139 880378

Email:
deedeefitness@gmail.com
d.salle@ecu.edu.au

Website: www.deedeefitness.com

Facebook:
Dee Dee Mahmood Fanpage
Dee Dee Mahmood / Dee Mahmood
Instagram: deedee_reebokambassador

Read our new community health & research initiative:
Walking Football4Health FB Page





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